The Lowdown on Low Code

Low coding. A software program that makes it possible to develop applications with very little manual coding. A graphical user interface (GUI) makes this possible through its built-in drag-and-drop tooling feature. The technology has been developed in recent years due to a shortage of high-level coders felt across the globe.





Compare low coding to that of editing your pretty iPhone photo of the fall scenery through Instagram instead of buying a $2,000 digital camera and producing a “true” professional photograph.


Low coding contrasts with the traditional method of application making – one that requires extensive man hours, manual coding, and highly trained (and paid) coding experts.


Advantages:

Quicker Output: Streamlining and automating the coding process makes it feasible for large companies to churn out far more apps than they would if relying solely on man power to code. Instead of being stuck perfecting one app, you’re onto your next creative idea in half the time. Speed to market increases.





Financial Incentive: Companies who elect to go the route of low code aren’t waiting around for skilled coders to become available. They’re also not paying high-level coders a ton of money. Additionally, these companies put out apps at a much faster rate than those not utilizing low code. What does this mean? The opportunity to save and make more money.



The popularity of low-code application development has gained decent traction these days — according to Gartner, low-code is forecast to comprise over 65% of application development by 2024.






Disadvantages:

Non-Personal feel: It seems obvious, no? How could applications hardly touched by a human being compare to those that have been nurtured and personalized throughout the development process? They can't.